If you’ve been sugaring for any length of time, you know what I’m talking about: at some point, the paste just stops working.  It turns white; it loses its elasticity; it sticks to your skin and just doesn’t come off.  (If this is happening to you, see the FAQ for what you can do about it.)

The question is: why?

I heard an interesting hypothesis a few months ago: sugar paste stops working when it gets too clogged up by dead skin cells.

That sounds reasonable enough.  One of the reasons sugaring is great for sensitive skin is that it sticks well to dead skin cells but not live ones (so you’re not going to rip your skin off, like you can with wax if you go over the same area too many times).  And sugaring is a great way to exfoliate.

So I decided to try to test this.  Basically, I added exfoliation via apple cider vinegar to my evening routine to see if that makes the sugar last longer.  It’s too early to say, but I’m cautiously optimistic…

How about you?  Have you noticed a correlation between exfoliating and your sugar effectiveness?


 

Exfoliating with apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is basically acetic acid (plus various apple-y nutrients/smells) and it helps slough off the outermost layer of dead skin cells. It’s like a weak version of a facial peel… except you probably won’t use it on your face.

I’m doing this on legs, but pay attention to how your skin feels before and after applying apple cider vinegar, especially if you’re applying it on sensitive skin!  If you notice any irritation or dryness, dilute the apple cider vinegar more.

  1. Mix up 2 parts apple cider vinegar to 1 part water.  (I store this in a little travel-size toiletries bottle.)
  2. Apply to skin with a cotton pad.

That’s all.  It stops smelling like vinegar once it dries.

P.S. Some people find that apple cider vinegar helps with acne; if you try this, do be careful, as it can also dry your skin out… which makes acne worse.

Advertisements